Lens

10/25/2011 | | Staff Writer | Lens

In Berlin, Gleis 17 (railroad platform 17) means more than a transportation site.

It’s where part of the Final Solution began.

The first deportations of Jews from the capital of the Third Reich started 70 years ago last week on Track 17 of the Berlin Grunewald station, with 1,000 people bound for the Lodz ghetto in Poland. The date was commemorated with a ceremony in which Holocaust survivors, leaders of the current Jewish community and German politicians took part.

10/25/2011 | | Associate Editor | Lens

Even diehard “reduce, reuse and recycle” proponents have to get something new occasionally.

Just before Rosh HaShanah, the 18-year-old beacon of Jewish environmentalism, the Teva Learning Center, acquired a new website, new logo and new name: Teva Learning Alliance. A few weeks later, it became one of 50 nonprofits included in the seventh annual Slingshot: Resource Guide for Jewish Innovation.

10/18/2011 | | Lens

Like any sukkah, the 10-by-10-foot tarpaulin hut put up by the Academy for Jewish Religion in Riverdale last week attracted people committed to religious tradition.

In the case of some who ate and studied in the AJR sukkah, it’s the Catholic tradition.

The nondenominational rabbinical school is located on the campus of the College of Mount Saint Vincent, a Catholic institution that is also the home of nuns affiliated with the Sisters of Charity.

10/11/2011 | | Staff Writer | Lens

One of New York City’s busiest — and briefest — shopping centers made its annual appearance this week.

Between Sunday, the day after Yom Kippur, and Wednesday, erev Sukkot, a stretch of several blocks along the south side of Main Street in Queens’ heavily Jewish Kew Gardens Hills neighborhood, became a pre-holiday bazaar. At wooden tables set up along the street, Sukkot supplies went on sale.

Available were Four Species sets and materials for family sukkahs. And, in once-a-year storefronts, ready-to-assemble sukkahs themselves.

10/11/2011 | | Staff Writer | Lens

Chanan Reitblat, a Lithuanian-born and American-bred post-graduate student at Yeshiva University, went to Scotland’s historic St. Andrews University earlier this year to study chemistry and learned a lesson in contemporary politics.

10/04/2011 | | Staff Writer | Lens

Casting one’s sins, symbolically, upon the waters is a minor part of the High Holy Days, certainly less important and less spiritually valuable than Rosh HaShanah’s shofar, Yom Kippur’s fasting and both days’ prayer and repentance. Nonetheless, Tashlich is a strong tradition.

Like at Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, above, where Jews have gathered for decades, walking from nearby Crown Heights and Borough Park and Flatbush, to throw breadcrumbs into the lake, to read some biblical verses and to mingle.

And under the Brooklyn Bridge.