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Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

04/26/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week Online | Opinion

For me, like for most Israelis, the two weeks between the end of Passover and Yom Haatzma’ut, Israel’s Independence Day, are a time of year in which big concepts materialize in one’s daily life - our emergence as a people in the Exodus, the memory of the horrors of the Holocaust on Yom HaShoah, the remembrance, on Yom Hazikaron (Memorial Day), of the Fallen, through the celebration of the founding of the State of Israel.

04/24/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Ever since Hebrew schools were formed, there have not been formalized, nationally-instituted feedback mechanisms by which students of yeshivot, day schools or supplemental schools could express themselves. As a result, students have not had any way to comment — positively or negatively — on their classroom experience.

Alvin Schiff, a leader in supplemental Jewish education, has stated, “If Jewish education loses its vitality, the very survival of the American Jewish community will be endangered.”

04/24/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

The State of Israel is nothing short of a true miracle: in her 64 years, Israel has achieved more than any other nation on earth, a miracle that was created by a mosaic of different groups.

A wise man once said that Israel is the only country in the world that was founded on a dream: each group had its own — one was hoping to recreate an Eastern European shtetl, another was dreaming of an egalitarian kibbutz; one aspired for an urban Western style of bourgeoisie, and the other was eying the Orient. At times, our various dreams and aspirations collided.

04/17/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Ninety years ago this spring, on 86th Street in Manhattan, the first girl became a bat mitzvah. Judith Kaplan Eisenstein was invited to read from a chumash (a printed book of the Torah) — not a Torah scroll — on a Saturday morning — not a Friday night — by her father, Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan. She read and a revolution began. 

04/17/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

While flying home from Israel recently I struck up a conversation with the bright young haredi man sitting beside me. Before our talk, he had been busily studying a wonderful rabbinic text, “Mishnah Zevachim,” which details the laws concerning Temple sacrifices in ancient times. But God, it seemed, continued to be found in the text and not in me, so when I sensed that he was more interested in resuming his studies, I found a way to end the conversation so we could return to our respective pastimes.

04/10/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

One of the greatest accomplishments of the Zionist movement was its ability to tolerate and even encourage differing and often mutually challenging perspectives and ideologies. It is ironic, bordering on tragic, that the fulfillment of the Zionist dream has resulted in an increasingly narrow sphere of discourse and acceptable ideation.

We are becoming more insular, accepting only a small range of views and calling others by exclusionary and outright insulting names.