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Editorial & Opinion | Letters

12/07/2010 | | Letters

For the record, I wish to clarify my position on the halachic definition of death as pertains to the Dec. 3 story on the Rabbinical Council of America report on brain death and the manner in which my views were cited (“RCA Backs Off Stand On Brain Death For Transplants”).

12/07/2010 | | Letters

 My family and I were upset and disappointed to read the inaccurate Rabbinical Council of America report on determining death (“RCA Backs Off Stand On Brain Death For Transplants,” Dec. 3).

12/07/2010 | | Letters

As an Orthodox physician working at a major New York City hospital, I am distressed to read the Rabbinical Council of America position on organ donations as you reported (“RCA Backs Off Stand On Brain Death For Transplants,” Dec. 3).

12/07/2010 | Letters

The recently released study by the Vaad Halacha of the Rabbinical Council of America that may reverse the RCA’s 1991 halachic acceptance of brain death as death may have serious consequences for Orthodox Jews needing organs from brain-dead donors (“RCA Backs Off Stand On Brain Death For Transplants,” Dec. 3).
 

In addition, the study will raise questions about the ethical integrity of halacha among Jews and non-Jews.

11/30/2010 | | Letters

In his thoughtful review of Gal Beckerman’s book on the Soviet Jewry movement “Inside an ‘Epic Struggle,’” (Fall Books, Nov. 19), Jerome Chanes expertly discusses Beckerman’s deftness in describing both the impact of the movement on “the inter-organizational cholent” of U.S. Jewry and other virtues of the study.

11/30/2010 | | Letters

In your article, “Not Getting To The Mountain Top” (Nov. 19), and in the play, “Imagining Heschel,” I fear the impression created on the rabbi’s ultimate impact on the Vatican’s Second Council, which culminated in “Nostra Aetate,” was not properly represented. To state that “Heschel failed” [as Richard Dreyfuss did] is dead wrong.