Stony Brook Film Festival
view counter

Editorial & Opinion | Letters

08/09/2011 | | Letters

It was really surprising to see the photograph with COJECO name on the front page of the Aug. 5 issue (“Young Russian Jews In Assimilation Bind”) and the caption: “Young Russian Jews wear orange while older community members wear traditional white and blue.” The truth is that this year for the first time all Russian Jewish grass-roots organizations decided to march together in support of Israel as one contingent — young and old, religious and secular, Sephardi and Ashkenazi.

08/09/2011 | | Letters

I read with much interest Ben Sales’ article (“Young Russian Jews In Assimilation Bind, Aug. 5), which contains some valuable observations. However, the community it discusses is way more complex and richly textured than suggested by this article and similar commentaries that often set up two ill-defined groups against each other (“young” vs. “old”) and then generalize about them on the basis of anecdotal evidence.

08/02/2011 | | Letters

I read with great interest Stewart Ain’s article on the demographic changes taking place along the West Hempstead-Franklin Square border (“W. Hempstead Boundary Blues,” July 29) and how area congregations are being affected by and dealing with these changes. While I found the article informative, I was somewhat dismayed by the misleading and downright untrue references made with respect to the Malverne Jewish Center.

08/02/2011 | | Letters

Your editorial (‘How Obama Can Assure Israelis,’ July 8) argues that the crux of the problem in making peace is the “Palestinians’ refusal to recognize a Jewish state in the region” and that the U.S. must demand that the Palestinian Authority (PA) drop the so-called “right of return” and abrogate its unity government agreement with Hamas.

Vitally important as these things are, this is deeply inadequate.

08/02/2011 | | Letters

Kudos to Gary Rosenblatt for mapping out a more ideal approach to Israel advocacy (“We’ve Got It Backward, Israel Education Should Come First,” Between The Lines, July 22). He correctly diagnoses the problem of emphasizing “hasbara” while downplaying or even ignoring Israel education in general. Without a connection to the land of Israel and the State of Israel, advocates are left bereft of any core personal investment in the country.

08/02/2011 | | Letters

Education before advocacy (“We’ve Got It Backward, Israel Education Should Come First,” Between The Lines, July 22) sounds reasonable. But look at what is defined as education — “what Israel can and should be,” emphasis of the “facts” and Israel as a “work in progress” which “must maintain standards of pluralism, tolerance and morality held dear by American Jews.”